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Progress on 2017 Outcomes

Reduce average per capita potable water use by 20%

The City reached the Mayor’s 20% reduction goal in January. Average potable water use decreased from 131 to 104 gallons per capita per day. View Graph

Reduce average per capita potable water use by 20%

The City reached the Mayor’s 20% reduction goal in January. Average potable water use decreased from 131 to 104 gallons per capita per day. View Graph

Reduce average per capita potable water use by 20%

The City reached the Mayor’s 20% reduction goal in January. Average potable water use decreased from 131 to 104 gallons per capita per day. View Graph

Reduce average per capita potable water use by 20%

The City reached the Mayor’s 20% reduction goal in January. Average potable water use decreased from 131 to 104 gallons per capita per day. View Graph

Reduce average per capita potable water use by 20%

The City reached the Mayor’s 20% reduction goal in January. Average potable water use decreased from 131 to 104 gallons per capita per day. View Graph

Reduce average per capita potable water use by 20%

The City reached the Mayor’s 20% reduction goal in January. Average potable water use decreased from 131 to 104 gallons per capita per day. View Graph

Reduce average per capita potable water use by 20%

The City reached the Mayor’s 20% reduction goal in January. Average potable water use decreased from 131 to 104 gallons per capita per day. View Graph

Reduce average per capita potable water use by 20%

The City reached the Mayor’s 20% reduction goal in January. Average potable water use decreased from 131 to 104 gallons per capita per day. View Graph

Reduce average per capita potable water use by 20%

The City reached the Mayor’s 20% reduction goal in January. Average potable water use decreased from 131 to 104 gallons per capita per day. View Graph

LA Leads

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Feature Story

Introducing New Water-Saving Building Standards

Los Angeles continues to lead in water conservation nationwide. In 2016 new measures were incorporated into the City’s Green Building Code mandating water- saving technologies in new buildings, landscapes and additions or alterations costing more than $200,000. Responding to Mayor Garcetti’s Executive Directive No. 5 (“Emergency Drought Response”), the Department of Building and Safety partnered with stakeholders to draft the most stringent water conservation measures in any big city in the U.S., which went into e ect in June.

The new rules require a 20 percent reduction in indoor water use through the installation of more efficient plumbing fixtures and fittings. They also set water budgets for landscape irrigation to be consistent with statewide standards. New multi-family dwellings and commercial buildings larger than 50,000 square feet must include sub-meters, giving occupants an incentive to save water. Buildings must also be greywater-ready and use recycled water where available.

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“These are important steps toward creating a water-wise city far into the future. New buildings should reflect the 21 st -century appreciation of water as a critical resource.”

- Mayor Eric Garcetti

How Much Water Did We Save?

Olympic-sized swimming pool = 660,430 gallons of water

Since November 2014, L.A. has reduced water use by 57.8 billion gallons, the equivalent of 87,519 Olympic-sized swimming pools.

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City Wins

Encouraging ‘Reasonable’ Water Use and Sustainable Turf Removal

LADWP amended the City’s Water Conservation Ordinance in May 2016, creating an Unreasonable Use of Water prohibition. The new rule incentivizes residents to conserve water or face hefty financial penalties. In September 2016, LADWP also implemented new rebate guidelines for Watershed-Approach Turf Removal, which promote sustainable landscaping by adding stormwater capture and environmentally conscious requirements.

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Encouraging ‘Reasonable’ Water Use and Sustainable Turf Removal

LADWP amended the City’s Water Conservation Ordinance in May 2016, creating an Unreasonable Use of Water prohibition. The new rule incentivizes residents to conserve water or face hefty financial penalties. In September 2016, LADWP also implemented new rebate guidelines for Watershed-Approach Turf Removal, which promote sustainable landscaping by adding stormwater capture and environmentally conscious requirements.

Encouraging ‘Reasonable’ Water Use and Sustainable Turf Removal

LADWP amended the City’s Water Conservation Ordinance in May 2016, creating an Unreasonable Use of Water prohibition. The new rule incentivizes residents to conserve water or face hefty financial penalties. In September 2016, LADWP also implemented new rebate guidelines for Watershed-Approach Turf Removal, which promote sustainable landscaping by adding stormwater capture and environmentally conscious requirements.

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Partner Wins

Encouraging ‘Reasonable’ Water Use and Sustainable Turf Removal

LADWP amended the City’s Water Conservation Ordinance in May 2016, creating an Unreasonable Use of Water prohibition. The new rule incentivizes residents to conserve water or face hefty financial penalties. In September 2016, LADWP also implemented new rebate guidelines for Watershed-Approach Turf Removal, which promote sustainable landscaping by adding stormwater capture and environmentally conscious requirements.

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Encouraging ‘Reasonable’ Water Use and Sustainable Turf Removal

LADWP amended the City’s Water Conservation Ordinance in May 2016, creating an Unreasonable Use of Water prohibition. The new rule incentivizes residents to conserve water or face hefty financial penalties. In September 2016, LADWP also implemented new rebate guidelines for Watershed-Approach Turf Removal, which promote sustainable landscaping by adding stormwater capture and environmentally conscious requirements.

Encouraging ‘Reasonable’ Water Use and Sustainable Turf Removal

LADWP amended the City’s Water Conservation Ordinance in May 2016, creating an Unreasonable Use of Water prohibition. The new rule incentivizes residents to conserve water or face hefty financial penalties. In September 2016, LADWP also implemented new rebate guidelines for Watershed-Approach Turf Removal, which promote sustainable landscaping by adding stormwater capture and environmentally conscious requirements.

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